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Wireless connection keeps saying validating identity

While there are detail differences between SSL and TLS the following descriptions apply to both protocols.Note: SSLv2 was banned by RFC 6176 which contains a dire list of its shortcomings.

When a secure connection is initially established it will, depending on the implementation, negotiate support of the particular protocol from the set SSLv3, TLSv1, TLSv1.1 or TLSv1.2.

Such is the pervasive power of the name SSL that in most cases what is called SSL is most likely using TLS - for instance Open SSL supports both SSL (v3) and TLS (TLSv1, TLSv1.1 and TLSv1.2) protocols.

And if your eyes glaze over when people start talking about SSL, security and certificates - start glazing now. The RFC hyperlinks in the page below link to a plain text version which was copied to our site when the RFC was issued.

We started doing this a long, long time ago when RFCs were maintained in some strange places, occasionally moved location, and performance and reliability of the repositories was very variable (being generous). The IETF, like IANA, have solid web sites with excellent performance and continually improving features.

The main repository for RFCs is maintained by the IETF, text versions (the normative reference) may be viewed at org/rfc/rfc or (where XXXX is the 4 digit RFC number - left padded with zeros as necessary).

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Currently published RFCs are pointed to https:// XXXX which contains various information and links to the text (normative) reference and a PDF (non-normative) version. The major use of SSL (X.509) certificates is in conjunction with the TLS/SSL protocol.

The RFC may also be viewed at XXXX/ which also contains various RFC status information (including errata) together with a list of alternative formats, such as, text, PDF and HTML (this is the working area version of the document). We update the page from time-to-time when we can think of nothing better to do with our lives and now keep a change log in case you ever happen to read it twice. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a Netscape protocol originally created in 1992 to exchange information securely between a web server and a browser where the underlying network was insecure.

It went through various iterations and is now at version 3 (dating from 1995) and used in a variety of clientserver applications.

Creating self-signed certificates is presented as a worked example of the use of the Open SSL package.

We've also added some info on the contents of various file types (.pem, .p12, .pfx, .der, .cer), PEM keywords and a PKCS to RFC mapping list.

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